environement

Avani battles against plastic waste

AVANI

Avani is social enterprise based in Bali, Indonesia, the epicenter of the battle against plastic waste. Assumed by most as a tropical island paradise with pristine white sand beaches, the truth is that Bali's beaches are now often saturated with garbage and debris, and the majority of this trash is plastic. We aim to help rehabilitate the island by offering sustainable, eco-friendly alternatives to hazardous products that locals and tourists use every day.

Airquality

Visit for daylight updates online WORLD AIR QUALITY

Indonesian startup Mycotech from Bandung

visit: MYCOTECH<

By researching and producing composite building materials from vegetable waste using low technology that bind with mushroom mycielia, we address a range of economic, environmental and socio-cultural issues, bring together material and bio-engineers and architects, and propagate an integrated system of crop cultivation and crop waste management. We promote a multi-disciplinary approach to problem solving that ensures a transfer of knowledge across various disciplines in an investigative framework.

Borneo: Die Lunge der Erde

See video: Spiegel Magazin<

Der Regenwald in Indonesien schrumpft dramatisch, weil Bauern und Konzerne die Flächen als Ackerland nutzen wollen. Vier Aktivisten kämpfen dagegen, mit ganz unterschiedlichen Methoden: von den bloßen Händen bis zum Smartphone.

Eine Multimedia-Story von der Insel Borneo von Jacopo Ottaviani (Text) und Isacco Chiaf (Fotos/Videos)

River of garbage

Domestic waste, at 80 percent, remains the top contributor to water pollution in Indonesia.

Jakarta

Wie viele Menschen genau in der indonesischen Hauptstadt Jakarta leben, lässt sich nur grob schätzen - auf jeden Fall wohl mehr als zehn Millionen. In der angrenzenden Metropolregion Jabodetabek sind es sogar 30 Millionen. Und wo viele Menschen sind, da ist auch viel Müll. Dieser Arbeiter kämpft sich mit seinem Floß durch den auf einem Fluss im Norden Jakartas schwimmenden Abfall.

Setting a country alight: Indonesia's devastating forest fires are manmade

Thousands of the fires raging through the forests of Indonesia were deliberately started to clear land for industrial use. The results have been deadly

Fires in a palm oil concession in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Thousands of fires have been lit to clear land because it is 75% cheaper than other methods.

Photograph: Victor Barro/Walhi/Friends of the Earth Indonesia
Irhash Ahmady and Sam Cossar-Gilbert
Saturday 7 November 2015 11.04 GMT Last modified on Saturday 7 November 2015 11.07 GMT

How Indonesia’s gigantic fires are making global warming worse

UPDATE: Emissions from Indonesian fires have continued to rise since this article was published and now are estimated to be roughly equal to Japan’s annual carbon dioxide emissions. See here.

Experts say that along with dramatic global coral bleaching, thousands of fires across Indonesia represents the next sign of an intensifying global El Niño event. And the consequences, in this case, could affect the entire globe’s atmosphere.